Delaney, USCFA Player Summer 2011

Delaney, USCFA Player Summer 2011

For this third session I am going to add a few different exercises to the first. Agian a reminder that TECHNIQUE AND MECHANICS are critical!

OBJECTIVE- Create Foot Speed, and Recognition Reaction to first make the mental decision (First Touch) before the Application of that decision (second touch). Some call this future passing, we refer to it as secondary passing… i.e. knowing where the ball goes before it comes to your foot.

Just going through the exercises without focusing on the coaching points will be a mistake and will create bad habits reinforced by repetition and muscle memory.

 

 WARM UP
Deceleration Lunges

In addition to the warm up exercise from session #1 and #2, this is a low dynamic exercise that teaches each player not only muscle memory and the proper posture for Straight Ahead Speed, it helps in developing explosive power and recognition reaction which is what this session will be based on.

Players will march forwarsd, lunging with proper S.A.S mechanics, open set, elbows locked at 90 degree angles, while slowly squat down to a sitting position (knees to 90 degrees). Be careful not to lunge forward, and keep the capsule tight. Front foot will be flat, squating to the 90 degree angle, and the back foot will be on the ball of the foot (back leg straight). Make sure the arm action (exchange) is precise = elbows locked in 90 degree angles, and the arms moving straight ahead. Lead arm to the cheek, and swing arm past the hip.

Video – Agility Deceleration Lunges

WARM UP WITH THE BALL

Continue with the exercises from sessions #1 and #2. This next exercise is a great way to increase recognition reaction, foot speed, and adjusting to the changing shape of the game

WIDE OUTS WITH THE BALL

Have the players begin with their hands behind the back as seen in the video. HAve them perform quick choppy steps in and out for about 5 seconds. Their partner plays them the ball. As the ball comes in they must release the hands get into a good set (elbows locked in 90 degree angles) play 1 touch back, and then go back into the wideouts wqith hands behind the back).

Coaching points -

1) No clicking of the feet,

2) Short 6 inch steps in and out,

3) Stay square with the ball and target at all times,

3) Release to adjust into proper shape for 1 touch pass return.

Video – Wideouts with the ball

S.A.Q.

LAdders -  Opening the hips– We likewise use this exercise to teach out defenders how to get sideways on, and be able to turn while opening the hips, and being in control of the body. We simply call this exercise “Swivel Hips”

Coaching Points -

1) Keep the front foot facing forward,

2) Keep the back foot flat

3) Keep the head, and midline of the body in the middle of the ladder

4) Swing the hip under sontrol

Video – Swivel Hips

In Speed and Soccer,
Billy Elias

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Brandon, 2011 USCFA Summer Select

Brandon, 2011 USCFA Summer Select

RECEIVING AWAY FROM PRESSURE (TO THE BACK FOOT)
PART II

 

 

 

 

For this second session I am going to add a few different exercises to the first. AS the parent coach or trainer you will be able to mix and match these as you go. I will remind you that with all of these sessions TECHNIQUE AND MECHANICS are critical!

Just going through the exercises without focusing on the coaching points will be a mistake and will create bad habits reinforced by repetition and muscle memory.

 

WARM UP
Dynamic Agility  Squats

In addition to the warm up exercise from session #1, this is a low dynamic exercise that teaches each player to keep a good open set (TM), and improves posture, flexibility, and even acceleration.

Players will keep shoulders behind the knees, open set, elbows locked at 90 degree angles, and slowly squat down to a sitting position (knees to 90 degrees)

Video – Dynamic Agility Squats

WARM UP WITH THE BALL

Coordinated Touches x3– Progression from session #1Get the players to focus on receiving away from pressure. If the ball is coming from the left, receive with the right, and vice versa.

This teaches the players to learn how the foot mechanics for receiving to the opposite foot, and playing away with two touches with a coordinated pattern. MAKE SURE THEIR FEET ARE MOVING. As they progress, you will notice that we try to have the ball played in two touches, and three steps.

Video – Coordinated Touches x3

S.A.Q.

Hurdles –  Opening the hips– Set up two hurdles as seen. Make sure the players get their feet over the hurdles, open the hip and go to the cone. Knees and Ankles stay locked in 90 degrees. When they reset themselves, make sure they open the set, and go the opposite way.

Video – Hurdles – Opening the Hip

Again, each week we will use a different apparatus of S.A.Q. equipment to accomplish our goal, as well as exercises that progress from this first session. Before the progression is attempted, make sure each player has a working understanding of what you are trying to accomplish.

As with anything when it comes to S.A.Q., MECHANICS are the most important.

In Speed and Soccer,
Billy Elias

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air attackRECEIVING AWAY FROM PRESSURE (TO THE BACK FOOT)
PART I

Video Introduction

I suppose that every trainer coach or parent coach has their pet peeve when it comes to the development of players. Well, to cut to the chase, this one is mine. The fourth part of our Speed of Play philosophy is switching the field away from pressure.

In order to teach this, the mechanics on receiving the ball with the back foot needs to become second nature. When it is not, speed of play will break down and when you are playing against well-trained and disciplined teams that pressure well, react well, and now how to counter your attack, this is a critical skill for not only organization, but also its speed, and coordination.

The Back Foot – When receiving from one side of the field, do so with the foot opposite that side. Therefore, if the ball is being played from the right side of the field, we want to receive the ball with the left foot, and vice versa. The second step is to receive the ball away from the body at 45º angle so the player can turn the head, and open the hips to the whole field.

***PROBLEM*** – Too many players receive the ball on the front foot, thus keeping the ball into pressure. If they have learned to use the back foot, they play the ball straight ahead of them, thus slowing down speed of play, and forcing the ball forwards prematurely, or attempting a split or through ball that fails.

***DIAGNOSIS*** The Hips are to tight, and cannot open!

As a result, I have developed an entire S.A.Q. curriculum based on this simple yet rarely taught skill.

WARM UP
One of the coordinated exercises we use that is good for players of all ages is dynamic in nature and we call it opening the gate.

Perhaps the biggest problem that I have found in developing this skill is loosening the hips of the player. Far too many have “tight Hips”. You can teach them to receive the ball to the back foot, but they cannot open the hip enough to get the ball moving away from pressure to the intended target.

Video – Opening The Gate

WARM UP WITH THE BALL

Coordinated Touches – Get the players to focus on receiving away from pressure. If the ball is coming from the left, receive with the right, and vice versa.

This teaches the players to learn how the foot mechanics for receiving to the opposite foot, and playing away with two touches with a coordinated pattern. MAKE SURE THEIR FEET ARE MOVING. As they progress, you will notice that we try to have the ball played in two touches, and three steps.

Video – Coordinated Touches

S.A.Q.

Low Box Lateral Hops – Make sure the players open the set, stay square and keep the hips open on the box.

You can substitute Egg Crates or office crates from staples for the wooden boxes. We obviously use the wooden boxes for durability and we have an entire curriculum just for using these boxes. However, using an egg or milk crate, or office-carrying box works just as good and they are much cheaper.

Video – Low Boxes Lateral Hops

Low Box Substitute

Low Box Substitute

Each week we will use a different apparatus of S.A.Q. equipment to accomplish our goal, as well as exercises that progress from this first session. Before the progression is attempted, make sure each player has a working understanding of what you are trying to accomplish.

As with anything when it comes to S.A.Q., MECHANICS are the most important.

In Speed and Soccer,
Billy Elias

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Tyler Dickson

Tyler (U15) USCFA 2011

Speed, Agility, and Quickness for Foot Speed, First Touch, and Coordination Part III

by Billy Elias

In Part III we are going to add some field agilities as well as some new coordinated warm up exercises. WE will also progress these agility exercises with the ball.

COORDINATED WARM UP

In addition to the other Global Coordinated Exercises we add one a week. In our mindset the warm up without the ball should take at least 25 minutes. For some teams we will run whatever their half would run (older teams will go for 30 minutes in a warm up without the ball, and then 15 – 20 with the ball). This is one of my favorites and it not only looks good, but it really helps with Global Coordination purposes. It’s a very simple exercise but it really reinforces the importance of open set (TM) training, and body management off the pivot.

COUNT, CLAP, and PIVOT

The whole idea is to stay square before the pivot and after. The set (TM) should remain open, and the hips, shoulders, and toes should be square. The players count to three double clap and pivot. For many, it seems easier than it looks only because it is specific for body mechanics and control.

Video Count, Clap, and Pivot

1st  Touch Development with Disorientation x2

This is another great exercise using disorientation that will certainly help with body mechanics, center of gravity and mental focus. It is based on recovery, and changing of shapes.

Your players can either get double touch close or a little bit further apart. They play two touches as usual. On the command, they backpedal, perform either a side roll, front roll or cartwheel, and then return the ball with one touch. After the return they must turn quickly to their second partner and repeat the exercise. We run the exercise between 30 and 45 seconds pending the age group

Video 1st touch development with disorientation x2

BOX HOPS (triples and go)

This is a common exercise that I’ve seen many times before. In the progression, we add a ball with touches and traps. HOWEVER, this is an exercise where mechanics and foot speed is stressed.

The players double slalom hop in and then immediately explode into triples (In-In- Out, In – In – Out, In – In – Accelerate)). After completing the triples progression, they must accelerate out. Their body lean must be on the 45 degree angle, with their knees, elbows, and ankles locked in 90 degree ankles. We use this as the forerunner to being able to receive the ball under control into possession back into motion (next installment).

Make sure the mechanics are perfect as the players progress with the exercise.

Video Box Hops, Triples and Go

Progression

In the progression to the above exercise we use the ball. The player must exit the hurdles and at about 8 – 10 yards play the ball back to the server. The server must sole trap the ball, killing it’s movement and then moving to the back of the line. The player running the hurdles must quickly turn and pass with Pace Weight and Accuracy to keep the flow of the exercise going.

Obviously first touch is key with control, and playing back with proper touch and return. Recognition Reaction is also a great technique for the players running the exercise. That is to be able to recognize the pace and shape of the ball coming at them while returning it properly.

Video Box Hops, Triples, Go and Touch

In our next installment, we’ll be adding some S.A.Q. exercises and some more Global Coordination, and hurdle exercises. Remember that hurdles can alsways be replaced with a soccer ball!

In Speed and Soccer,

Billy

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Speed, Agility, and Quickness for Foot Speed, First Touch, and Coordination Part II

by Billy Elias July 16, 2011 Coach Development

 
Speed, Agility, and Quickness for Foot Speed, First Touch, and Coordination
Part II
Billy Elias
 
 
COORDINATION with the WARM UP
In part II we want to talk a little more about the progressions we use for our players. ***IT is important to note that “TOE TAPS” can be used in a variety of different areas so to put video [...]

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Speed, Agility, and Quickness for Foot Speed, First Touch, and Coordination

by Billy Elias July 7, 2011 Coach Development

Speed, Agility, and Quickness
Foot Speed, First Touch, and Coordination
Part I
Billy Elias
(***some of these videos may be repetitive from prior articles, but as important. Please give them their fair due***)

Hear it all the time, see it in every tournament we play in, and now see it on the World Cup scene. The lack of ability [...]

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POSSESSION UNDER PRESSURE VI

by Billy Elias February 17, 2011 Coach Development

Possession Under Pressure
Part VI
Billy Elias
Single Legged Strength III
In this final installment are a few exercises that we use to really solidify Single Legged Strength, Balance, and Center of Gravity. These drills are difficult by nature and should be used carefully. Remember that when using the Single Legged Hops to only use at most 4 reps, [...]

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POSSESSION UNDER PRESSURE PART V

by Billy Elias January 19, 2011 Coach Development

Possession Under Pressure
Part V
Billy Elias
Single Legged Strength II
  
 
HOPSCOTCH
A great progression for single legged strength that has an element of Acceleration, and Quickness added to it.
It is called “HOP SCOTCH”. It is a single legged hop into box#1 followed by an open set™ over box #2. So in box #1 the player would single leg hop [...]

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